Originally posted from author Becky Gillette of the MS Business Journal. For the full article, visit djjournal.com

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, the largest manufacturing employer in Mississippi, currently has more than 11,300 people on staff, including union-represented craftsmen and women, engineers, planners, supply chain specialists, business management and program management professionals.

The company’s weekly payroll of $14 million has a tremendous economic benefit to the region.

HII announced July 6 that the Ingalls Shipbuilding division plans to hire more than 2,000 full-time shipbuilders as part of its future workforce plans.

“The new shipbuilders will join a skilled workforce that delivers critical capabilities to HII’s national security customers, including amphibious warships, destroyers, and national security cutters,” the company said in a press release. “Ingalls Shipbuilding is located on an 800-acre facility, having recently completed a state-of-the-art upgrade that includes covered workspaces to keep shipbuilders dry and cool.”

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division is the sole provider of the San Antonio-class amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. These ships feature many revolutionary design innovations, including enhanced war fighting and survivability capabilities, improved command and control capabilities, stealthy design elements, and several quality of life improvements.

Via The Hill by Seth Cropsey: 

The Sea Services should grasp the role large amphibious warships will play in a Pacific war. The Navy’s shipbuilding plan should reflect this and include a significant amphibious element to ensure its ability to fight and win in the western Pacific.

The Navy’s 30-year shipbuilding plan reveals a broader fight within the Defense Department. The issue is not simply strategic, but operational and force-structural — how to transform the Navy to ensure it can deter and defeat China in a large-scale Indo-Pacific war. As in World War II, a vital issue is the role of heavy amphibious assault ships in the Navy’s strategy.

The Navy’s current plan is — to understate it — out of touch with strategic reality.

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At minimum, the battle force will shrink from its level of just under 300 ships to 280 ships by 2027. The Navy then presents three alternative force structures, each with a “transition” period that expands the fleet to slightly under 300 ships. Under the most ambitious plan, the Navy will then reach 355 ships by 2043; under the other two plans, it will cap out in the mid-320s.

Numbers alone do not tell the whole story. The Navy’s current scheme, under all three of its plans, will include at least 31 amphibious warships by 2032. This nominally aligns with the requirements the Marine Corps has outlined — a force of at least 31 amphibious warships—versus the Navy’s desired 25 amphibious warships.

Two facts must be grasped — the role of amphibious warships in Indo-Pacific strategy and operational planning, and the sort of warships the Sea Services require.

Read the full story in The Hill.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

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The USN’s final category is Small UUVs (SUUV) that are portable and can be launched on the surface or from submarines. After a two-year prototyping effort involving multiple user evaluations and spiral developments, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on 30 March that its Remus 300 had received a contract under the Lionfish SUUV programme.

The Remus 300 defeated the Iver4 from L3Harris. The initial phase will see production and testing of Remus 300s over the ensuing year. In 2024, rapid fielding should occur.

Apart from its Lionfish success, HII announced in June 2021 its first export of the Remus 300 – four units sold to New Zealand for MCM and surveying tasks.

Standard Remus vehicles are the 100, 300, 600 and 6000, the numbers referring to their metre depth rating. More than 600 Remus and Seaglider UUVs have been sold to 30 countries. The Seaglider uses changes in buoyancy to move through the water in a saw-tooth pattern; because it has no external moving parts, it can stay at sea for nine months.

Read the full story in Naval Warfare Magazine.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

HII – formerly known as Huntington Ingalls Industries – has created a new concentrated effort that tackles unmanned and autonomous platforms and systems from core software development to hardware production, focusing on technological advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML).

“We’re using artificial intelligence and machine-learning algorithms to do sensing and perception, which goes into autonomy,” Duane Fotheringhamm, president of Unmanned Systems business group within HII’s Mission Technologies division, told Janes on 5 April during the Navy League Sea-Air-Space 2022 Conference and Exposition at National Harbor, Maryland.

That autonomy can be used, for example, to make sure an unmanned vessel adheres to the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGs), he said. “It can navigate the ship to follow the rules of the road.”

Autonomy can also be used to help control machinery in the engine room and make sure it is functioning properly and track maintenance needs, he added.

Read the full story at Jane’s Navy International

Huntington Ingalls Industries, the nation’s biggest builder of warships, is becoming something more: a leading provider of artificial intelligence, unmanned systems, digital reconnaissance, simulations and training for its military customer.

With a quarter of revenues now being generated outside its sprawling shipyards, newly-minted President & CEO Christopher D. Kastner says the company is investing in technologies that support the Navy’s future priorities, such as distributed maritime operations.

In recognition of the company’s evolving character, it will henceforth be known simply as HII—a name that can encompass diverse technologies—and recast its technical services unit as Mission Technologies.

Read the full story at Forbes

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