HII’s Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division welcomed media to the shipyard on Friday, Nov. 18 for a media day ahead of the keel authentication ceremony for Virginia-class submarine Arkansas (SSN 800).

Media outlets from Virginia and Arkansas toured the event site and talked with NNS leadership, shipbuilders, the commanding officer of PCU Arkansas, and members of the Little Rock Nine, Arkansas’ sponsors.

The Little Rock Nine made history in 1957 as the first African American students to attend all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in response to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, declaring racial segregation in public schools unconstitutional.

To learn more about Arkansas (SSN 800), visit HII.com/SSN800. Photos from the event are available at HII.com.

Check out coverage from WTKR, WVEC, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, and the story from the Daily Press below.

Members of Little Rock Nine mark milestone for new Virginia-class submarine Arkansas

(By Caitlyn Burchett, Nov. 18, 2022)

NEWPORT NEWS — Five members of the “Little Rock Nine” gathered Friday at Newport News Shipbuilding in preparation for the keel authentication ceremony of a new Virginia-class attack submarine that will pay homage to the group.

As sponsors and honorees of submarine Arkansas (SSN-800), their initials will be etched into the hull of the ship Saturday, representing the resiliency the Navy expects from its latest nuclear-powered attack submarine.

“Their characteristics of endurance and stick-to-itiveness are going to be part of this submarine and her crew forever,” said Jennifer Boykin, President of Newport News Shipbuilding.

Click here to read the full story from the Daily Press.

The news story below posted by WXXV News 25 highlights the Ingalls Apprentice School, which is one of the many ways you can start a career at Ingalls Shipbuilding, a division of HII.

The shipyard is proud to celebrate its apprentices this week for National Apprenticeship Week, which runs from Nov. 14-20.

The apprenticeship program allows people to earn competitive wages and receive comprehensive benefit packages while they learn their shipbuilding craft.

Several apprentice graduates have gone on to build careers at Ingalls, rising to positions of leadership in the company.

To learn more about the apprentice program or career opportunities at Ingalls Shipbuilding, visit hii.com/careers. Read the story from WXXV News 25 below:

Ingalls Shipbuilding honors apprentices for National Apprenticeship Week

(Nov. 16, 2022 by Rick Gogreve)

This week marks the eighth annual National Apprenticeship Week. The City of Pascagoula and Ingalls Shipbuilding are showing how much they appreciate their apprentices.

Apprenticeship Week is a time to celebrate those men and women in training to become full time workers at certain organizations.

While this is a national celebration, officials at Pascagoula City Hall are showing their appreciation on a more personal level by adopting a proclamation officially approving the recognition of the special week in the city. Training Rep and former apprentice Lloyd Stringer said, “It makes me feel so wonderful, so wonderful being an apprentice one time, being an alum now. It’s like Christmas.”

You can read the full story at WXXV News 25.

Some of the employees from HII’s office near the Navy Yard, in Washington, D.C., will move to a new space at National Landing in Arlington, Virginia, in summer of 2023. 

HII will retain office space in the Navy Yard to facilitate the close working relationship with HII’s largest customer, the U.S. Navy. HII’s corporate headquarters will remain at the VASCIC building in Newport News, Virginia.

The new space in National Landing (shown in this rendering) enhances HII’s presence in the national capital region and enables better access to a wider set of customers across the services. The new location is minutes away from the Pentagon, Department of Defense and Reagan National Airport which facilitates quick travel with HII’s divisions, customers and stakeholders.

You can read more in the Commercial Observer.  

“Take on assignments that expand your horizons, are going to be tough and cause you to operate differently, but are going to give you new experiences.”

Five HR executives share the moves they made and the skills they learned to make it to the top.

The article below in this month’s HR Magazine highlights senior executives of several different companies and the path they took to become a chief human resources officer (CHRO). One of the executives spotlighted is HII’s executive vice president and chief human resources officer, Edmond Hughes. Read more about Edmond’s career path, his learning moments and shared wisdom here:  

(HR Magazine, Fall Issue 2022, by Kate Rockwood)

Becoming a chief human resources officer (CHRO) or a chief people officer and joining a company’s C-suite is the goal of many rising HR professionals. It certainly is a great achievement to be placed in charge of all talent and seen as a key partner in the organization’s culture and strategy. If you’re an HR professional with your eyes set on making it to the top, the question then becomes: How do you get there?

Of course, the path to the C-suite isn’t the same for everyone. Some CHROs know from the start that HR is their calling. Others find their way there more slowly while exploring different areas of the business. And while it’s not unheard of for a CHRO to have no HR experience, most come from the field. In fact, the two titles HR executives are mostly likely to hold before moving to the C-suite are director or vice president of human resources, Payscale reports.

According to the HR executives interviewed for this article, those who want to make the leap to the top level must be curious, passionate, and deeply knowledgeable in both the HR and business arenas. Jumping on opportunities that come your way—and being willing to go off the beaten path at times—is crucial, too. Opportunities that give you more companywide exposure can serve as especially helpful steppingstones but may require you to take a more meandering, or even lateral, route to the top.

You can also read the full article at the How to Chart a Path to the C-Suite (shrm.org)

 

The article below posted by the Center for Maritime Strategy highlights The Apprentice School at Newport News Shipbuilding, which is one of the many ways you can start a career at the shipyard, a division of HII. You can learn more about both of HII’s apprentice schools: The Apprentice School at Newport News Shipbuilding here and The Ingalls Apprentice School here, as well as other ways to join HII here. Read the story from the Center for Maritime Strategy below:

(Navy League of the United States, Aug. 31, 2022, By the Center for Maritime Strategy)

With all the challenges in the world today, it goes without saying that America, an island nation, needs a powerful Navy. A lot of effort goes into our Constitutional requirement to “maintain a Navy,” and that means a robust warfighting platforms or ships and well-trained crews to sail them. Before we get there, however, we need a shipbuilding industrial base—shipyards and machines that bend metal and produce the finest warship in the world. In addition to the Sailors needed to fight these ships, we also need shipyard workers to build these vessels. This has been a constant challenge as the nation tries to level load our shipyards with new construction, repair, or modernization work throughout variations in strategies and Future Years Defense Plans (FYDP) across different administrations.

You can also read the full article at the Navy League of the United States.

The article posted below from William McCormick of ExecutiveBiz was published on Aug. 31, 2022, and includes an interview with Todd Borkey, chief technology officer of HII’s Mission Technologies division. 

You can also read the full article at ExecutiveBiz.


Todd Borkey, chief technology officer of HII Mission Technologies, recently spoke with ExecutiveBiz regarding the current set of challenges to keep pace with the speed of innovation as well as the significant contributions that HII Mission Technologies has made to the federal landscape and what the future holds during the latest Executive Spotlight interview.

You can read the full interview with Todd Borkey below.

ExecutiveBiz: What does HII Mission Technologies do? What are your markets?

Todd Borkey: “As you know, HII is a trusted producer of the U.S. Navy’s most complex warships. We have been advancing the HII business portfolio to become a thought leader for the all-domain force.

A product of our multi-billion dollar acquisition strategy, we formed the Mission Technologies division. Today we are a leader at transitioning new technology into the DoD mission. Making up about 25 percent of all HII revenue, we manage over $1 billion of RDT&E work alone.

We are a fast-growing business with market-leading positions in LVC (live, virtual, constructive) simulation and training; artificial intelligence and machine learning; C5ISR; cyber and electronic warfare; autonomy; and nuclear services.

Our portfolio is ideally suited for the needs of the coming decade, and our work tempo for the last few years has reinforced that. We think of ourselves as tech-agnostic integrators; however, we develop advanced technical capability when the client requires it.

We were an early mover in AI and Big Data, where we created several ‘first of their kind’ programs. We also develop and operate the world’s largest LVC enterprise.”

ExecutiveBiz: What is new and exciting at HII Mission Technologies?

Todd Borkey: “We are witnessing and helping create the data revolution, an industrial inflection equal to that of the internet. Almost every one of our markets is becoming data-driven, predictive and increasingly autonomous.

There is a combination of tech, never seen before, making it all possible. We have secure, affordable clouds, open-source models, high-performance computing to the edge, and commercial space offering global sensing and data distribution.

It’s a very exciting time where data is now strategic. We are now ‘finding needles in fast-moving haystacks.’”

ExecutiveBiz: What contribution to HII Mission Technologies are you most proud of?

Todd Borkey: “My team saw the AI revolution coming in 2017 at the Silicon Valley tech conferences. We began studying the breakthroughs and substantially moved our IRAD into creating AI-powered processes for our clients.

We now have AI/ML project applications in every one of our business groups. We were one of the first to deploy computer vision in autonomous ISR and perhaps the first to deploy multi-lingual natural language processing (NLP) at a massive scale.

As a result of our organic efforts, we have been ranked in the top 10 federal AI contractors by Deltek (GovWin) since 2019. The agility of the team, and its cultural effect, will always be a great point of pride for me.”

ExecutiveBiz: What are the challenges to keeping pace with this rate of technical change?

Todd Borkey: “Culturally we must stay curious, externally focused and opportunistic. But it’s all about people. The new force required to deliver the data revolution needs to be built.

Everything is new, and talent is in short supply. In this domain, defense primes must compete with Silicon Valley and fintech for resources. We invest in training and recruiting creatively; however, it is the quality of our work that brings and keeps people to HII Mission Technologies.

We get to work on the hardest and most modern problem sets within the DoD. That is very motivating and attracts talent.”

ExecutiveBiz: What does the future look like for Mission Technologies?

Todd Borkey: “We see commercial space, distributed processing and AI/ML having a massive impact on the way we operate within the next five years. Humans are moving from ‘in the loop’ to ‘on the loop.’

We will improve operational availability, detect threats sooner, increase resiliency, remove clutter, and make better decisions under dynamic and contested conditions. We are driving our portfolio of capabilities, and our clients, toward these new possibilities.

The demands on national security resources are extraordinary, and we are working intensely to give them an edge with the new tech. I see our division deploying even more expeditionary technology in the form of critical new data systems and analytic processes.

We are confident in our vision yet acutely focused on the customer need for the mission.”

About Todd Borkey

Todd Borkey is the chief technology officer at HII’s Mission Technologies division. Named to this position in August 2021, he is responsible for the division’s technology strategy, along with its developments and technical operations. Borkey supports HII’s growth by leading R&D investment, developing new technologies and advancing customer solutions that meet the changing needs of HII’s clients. He also leads HII’s Artificial Intelligence campaign, creating market-leading AI/ML solutions for the defense and intelligence markets.

About HII

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Greg McCarthy
(202) 264-7126
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Article below posted from author Megan Eckstein of Defense News on Aug. 22, 2022 after interviewing HII President and CEO Chris Kastner. 

HII contract focuses tech development on military’s urgent needs

(Defense News, Aug. 22, 2022) By Megan Eckstein)

WASHINGTON — A newly built-up division of American shipbuilder HII has several promising projects in development, and now also a contract with the Pentagon to marry them to urgent needs.

When HII — formerly called Huntington Ingalls Industries — rebranded in April as a global defense contractor, rather than just the largest U.S. shipbuilder, leaders spoke about the need to gain a foothold among the other armed services beyond the Navy. They also hoped to leverage the new Mission Technologies division to improve the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding and Newport News Shipbuilding programs.

You can read the full article: https://www.defensenews.com/industry/2022/08/22/hii-contract-focuses-tech-development-on-militarys-urgent-needs

About HII

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Greg McCarthy
[email protected]
(202) 302-1202
General Inquiries:
Sign Up For Email Alerts

Photo courtesy of USNI News. Article below posted from author Sam LaGrone of USNI News following his visit to Ingalls Shipbuilding Aug 4. 2022.  Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson spoke with Sam and a group of visiting reporters about the efforts the shipbuilder is making to improve efficiency, how they are focusing on retaining talent and the readiness of the yard to support future work. Read the story below:

Gulf Coast Shipyards Growing Capacity While Navy Shipbuilding Plans Remain Unsettled

(USNI News, Aug. 18, 2022) By Sam LaGrone

PASCAGOULA, Miss. — From the fantail of the 24,000-ton Richard M. McCool Jr., (LPD 28), one can see the world’s most complex warships coming together, with shipbuilders welding, painting and running cables in the Mississippi sun.

Two Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers – Leah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) and the first Flight III Burke Jack Lucas (DDG 125) – are under construction and moored nearby. Further down the pier the Coast Guard National Security Cutter Calhoun (WMSL 759) is nearing completion. Towering stories over the pier nearby, still primer white, is the half-way complete Bougainville (LHA 8), the Navy’s next 45,000-ton big deck amphibious ship, designed from the keel up to host Marine F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters. Just north of McCool is the angular hull of Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), awaiting the start of its combat systems activation before joining the fleet.

You can read the full article: https://news.usni.org/2022/08/17/gulf-coast-shipyards-growing-capacity-while-navy-shipbuilding-plans-remain-unsettled

About HII

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(228) 355-5663
General Inquiries:
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Originally posted from author Becky Gillette of the MS Business Journal. For the full article, visit djjournal.com

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, the largest manufacturing employer in Mississippi, currently has more than 11,300 people on staff, including union-represented craftsmen and women, engineers, planners, supply chain specialists, business management and program management professionals.

The company’s weekly payroll of $14 million has a tremendous economic benefit to the region.

HII announced July 6 that the Ingalls Shipbuilding division plans to hire more than 2,000 full-time shipbuilders as part of its future workforce plans.

“The new shipbuilders will join a skilled workforce that delivers critical capabilities to HII’s national security customers, including amphibious warships, destroyers, and national security cutters,” the company said in a press release. “Ingalls Shipbuilding is located on an 800-acre facility, having recently completed a state-of-the-art upgrade that includes covered workspaces to keep shipbuilders dry and cool.”

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division is the sole provider of the San Antonio-class amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. These ships feature many revolutionary design innovations, including enhanced war fighting and survivability capabilities, improved command and control capabilities, stealthy design elements, and several quality of life improvements.

Via The Hill by Seth Cropsey: 

The Sea Services should grasp the role large amphibious warships will play in a Pacific war. The Navy’s shipbuilding plan should reflect this and include a significant amphibious element to ensure its ability to fight and win in the western Pacific.

The Navy’s 30-year shipbuilding plan reveals a broader fight within the Defense Department. The issue is not simply strategic, but operational and force-structural — how to transform the Navy to ensure it can deter and defeat China in a large-scale Indo-Pacific war. As in World War II, a vital issue is the role of heavy amphibious assault ships in the Navy’s strategy.

The Navy’s current plan is — to understate it — out of touch with strategic reality.

Lpd+28+sea+trials+builders+october+21+2021 584 Hero

At minimum, the battle force will shrink from its level of just under 300 ships to 280 ships by 2027. The Navy then presents three alternative force structures, each with a “transition” period that expands the fleet to slightly under 300 ships. Under the most ambitious plan, the Navy will then reach 355 ships by 2043; under the other two plans, it will cap out in the mid-320s.

Numbers alone do not tell the whole story. The Navy’s current scheme, under all three of its plans, will include at least 31 amphibious warships by 2032. This nominally aligns with the requirements the Marine Corps has outlined — a force of at least 31 amphibious warships—versus the Navy’s desired 25 amphibious warships.

Two facts must be grasped — the role of amphibious warships in Indo-Pacific strategy and operational planning, and the sort of warships the Sea Services require.

Read the full story in The Hill.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

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Satellite: GALAXY 17 (91 degrees west)      

Transponder: Ku Digital 10 – Ch.C (9 Mhz)

Downlink Frequency: 11904.5 

Downlink Polarity: Vertical

FEC: 2/3

Symbol Rate: 7.5

DVBS2, 8PSK TRANSMISSION, 4:2:0, 1080i

Window: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. EST on Saturday, Nov. 19

Note: The six minute video that begins the ceremonial keel laying for Arkansas (SSN 800) includes copyrighted materials from HII/Newport News Shipbuilding and others.

©2022 Huntington Ingalls Industries/All Rights Reserved