PASCAGOULA, Miss., (Nov. 30, 2022) — HII’s (NYSE: HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) to the U.S. Navy today. Delivery of DDG 123 represents the official transfer of the ship from the shipbuilder to the Navy.

“Delivering an incredibly capable finished ship to the Navy is always an important event for our Ingalls team,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of Ingalls Shipbuilding. “We are absolutely committed to the work that we do for our customers, communities and country.”

Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee is the 34th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Ingalls has delivered to the Navy and will be the final Flight IIA ship built at Ingalls as the Navy transitions to Flight III destroyers. Ingalls currently has in production the future Arleigh Burke-class Flight III destroyers Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), Ted Stevens (DDG 128), Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129) and George M. Neal (DDG 131).

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships that can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the national defense strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. These ships contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

DDG 123 is named to honor Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee, a Navy nurse and first woman to receive the Navy Cross for her heroic actions during World War I. Higbee joined the Navy in October 1908 as part of the newly established Navy Nurse Corps, a group of women who would become known as “The Sacred Twenty,” and became the second superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps in January 1911. The ships motto truly reflects the heritage of this naval hero — Bellatrix illa, meaning “she is a warrior.”

Guided missile destroyer Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) completing acceptance trials Oct. 6 in Gulf of Mexico
Guided missile destroyer Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) completing acceptance trials

 

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About HII

HII is a global, all-domain defense partner, building and delivering the world’s most powerful, survivable naval ships and technologies that safeguard our seas, sky, land, space and cyber.

As America’s largest shipbuilder and with a more than 135-year history of advancing U.S. national defense, we are united by our mission in service of the heroes who protect our freedom. HII’s diverse workforce includes skilled tradespeople; artificial intelligence, machine learning (AI/ML) experts; engineers; technologists; scientists; logistics experts; and business professionals. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s workforce is 43,000 strong. For more information, visit:

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PASCAGOULA, Miss., (Oct. 7, 2022) — HII (NYSE: HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division completed acceptance trials for Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123).

“Completing a successful sea trial is always a significant accomplishment for our combined Ingalls and Navy team, and DDG 123 performed well,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “We are committed to this partnership and look forward to our next opportunity to demonstrate it during our next trial events for our first Flight III destroyer.”

DDG 123 is the second destroyer to be named in honor of Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee, the first woman to receive the Navy Cross. Higbee joined the Navy in October 1908 as part of the newly established Navy Nurse Corps, a group of women who would become known as “The Sacred Twenty,” and became the second superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps in January 1911.  

Ingalls has built 33 destroyers for the U.S. Navy, with five currently under construction including DDG 123, Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), Ted Stevens (DDG 128), Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129) and George M. Neal (DDG 131). DDG 123 will be the final Flight IIA destroyer Ingalls will deliver as the Navy transitions to Flight III destroyers.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships that can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. These ships contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Guided missile destroyer Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) completing acceptance trials
Guided missile destroyer Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) completing acceptance trials Oct. 6 in Gulf of Mexico

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About HII

HII is a global, all-domain defense partner, building and delivering the world’s most powerful, survivable naval ships and technologies that safeguard our seas, sky, land, space and cyber.

As America’s largest shipbuilder and with a more than 135-year history of advancing U.S. national defense, we are united by our mission in service of the heroes who protect our freedom. HII’s diverse workforce includes skilled tradespeople; artificial intelligence, machine learning (AI/ML) experts; engineers; technologists; scientists; logistics experts; and business professionals. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(228) 355-5663
General Inquiries:
Sign Up For Email Alerts

Photo courtesy of USNI News. Article below posted from author Sam LaGrone of USNI News following his visit to Ingalls Shipbuilding Aug 4. 2022.  Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson spoke with Sam and a group of visiting reporters about the efforts the shipbuilder is making to improve efficiency, how they are focusing on retaining talent and the readiness of the yard to support future work. Read the story below:

Gulf Coast Shipyards Growing Capacity While Navy Shipbuilding Plans Remain Unsettled

(USNI News, Aug. 18, 2022) By Sam LaGrone

PASCAGOULA, Miss. — From the fantail of the 24,000-ton Richard M. McCool Jr., (LPD 28), one can see the world’s most complex warships coming together, with shipbuilders welding, painting and running cables in the Mississippi sun.

Two Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers – Leah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123) and the first Flight III Burke Jack Lucas (DDG 125) – are under construction and moored nearby. Further down the pier the Coast Guard National Security Cutter Calhoun (WMSL 759) is nearing completion. Towering stories over the pier nearby, still primer white, is the half-way complete Bougainville (LHA 8), the Navy’s next 45,000-ton big deck amphibious ship, designed from the keel up to host Marine F-35B Lighting II Joint Strike Fighters. Just north of McCool is the angular hull of Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), awaiting the start of its combat systems activation before joining the fleet.

You can read the full article: https://news.usni.org/2022/08/17/gulf-coast-shipyards-growing-capacity-while-navy-shipbuilding-plans-remain-unsettled

About HII

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(228) 355-5663
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PASCAGOULA, Miss., Aug. 17, 2022 — HII (NYSE: HII) announced that the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129) on Tuesday, Aug. 16. The ship’s name honors former U.S. Sen. Jeremiah Denton Jr., a Vietnam War veteran who was awarded the Navy Cross for his heroism while a prisoner of war.

“Today, we honor the example of heroism and dedicated service to our nation set by the namesake of this ship,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “The inspiring story of Senator Denton reminds us of why we do what we do every day here at Ingalls. We have the highest level of respect for our namesake and are grateful to our sponsors, the daughters of our namesake, for honoring their father’s legacy with us today.”

Denton spent 34 years as a naval aviator, including eight years of torture as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. He is known for his act of genius during a televised broadcast in captivity, when Denton spelled out the word “torture” through Morse code using his eyes to blink the code. Following his career in the Navy, Denton was elected to the U.S. Senate representing his home state of Alabama in 1980.

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker delivered remarks highlighting the significance of Denton’s contributions to the nation during his time in the Navy and Senate.

The ship’s co-sponsors and daughters of the namesake, Madeleine Denton Doak and Mary Denton Lewis, were in attendance and joined Ingalls shipbuilders in welding their initials onto a steel plate, signifying the keel of DDG 129 as being “truly and fairly laid.” The plate will remain affixed to the ship throughout its lifetime.

Jeremiah Denton is the third Flight III destroyer to be constructed at Ingalls Shipbuilding. The Flight III upgrade incorporates a number of design modifications that collectively provide significantly enhanced capability.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the U.S. military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

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About HII

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(228) 355-5663
General Inquiries:
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PASCAGOULA, Miss., April, 13, 2022 — Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121) departed from HII’s (NYSE: HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division on Friday. Frank E. Petersen Jr. will be commissioned next month in Charleston, South Carolina, before sailing to its homeport at Hawaii’s Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

“I’m very grateful for the resilient and dedicated shipbuilders on our team, each is world class,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of the Ingalls Shipbuilding.

"Watching Frank E. Petersen Jr. sail away demonstrates what this shipyard is capable of, even in the face of a pandemic,” said Donny Dorsey, Ingalls vice president of operations and previously DDG 121 ship program manager. “The Ingalls Shipbuilding team, and all those that contribute to the mission, are the best. Despite challenges, the hard work of the entire shipbuilding team enable this very proud day — watching the Navy sail this ship and join the fleet to support the defense of our nation.”

Ddg+121 Sail+away Ls April+08+2022 1 Hero

Frank E. Petersen Jr. is the 33rd destroyer Ingalls has built for the U.S. Navy, with five more currently under construction at Ingalls, including Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123), Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), Ted Stevens (DDG 128), Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129) and George M. Neal (DDG 131). Ingalls is working with the Navy to keep the destroyer line strong as the Navy transitions to the next generation of guided missile destroyers.

Frank E. Petersen Jr. is named to honor the U.S. Marine Corps’ first African American aviator and general officer. After entering the Naval Aviation Cadet Program in 1950, Petersen went on to fly more than 350 combat missions during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss. (March 26, 2022) — HII (NYSE: HII) christened today pre-commissioning unit Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) at the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division.

Jack H. Lucas, a longtime resident of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, was the youngest Marine and youngest service member in World War II awarded the Medal of Honor. During a close firefight with Japanese soldiers, Lucas saved the lives of three Marines when he unhesitatingly placed himself on two grenades.

“Jack H. Lucas made a selfless decision to choose others and country over self,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “Our Ingalls shipbuilders have a deep appreciation and respect for what sailors and Marines do on behalf of our nation. We are proud to support them and to provide them this remarkable ship, our first Flight III destroyer.”

Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mike Gilday, was the keynote speaker.

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“Jack H. Lucas is not only the most capable and sophisticated surface combatant ever built by man, but it also represents the bridge from the past to the future, as we bring a new radar, the Aegis Baseline 10, and a new electric plant onto an already highly capable platform,” Gilday said. “Such an evolution would be impossible without the shipbuilders of Huntington Ingalls Industries and the Pascagoula community. Flight III represents the dedication and commitment of our sailors and civilians — the skill and innovation of our shipyards and industry partners — and the commitment of the American people to keep the seas free and open for all.”

“You have built the finest destroyer in the world,” Gilday said.

Jack H. Lucas is co-sponsored by Ruby Lucas, widow of the ship’s namesake, and Catherine B. Reynolds, chairman and CEO of the Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation. Together, the two sponsors officially christened the ship and made remarks during the ceremony.

“May the Jack H. Lucas be indestructible, just like he was,” Ruby Lucas said. “This first of its kind ship is advanced in integrity, courage and commitment to serve our great country. Jack never ran from a fight, and I’m certain that all aboard his namesake will represent Jack with honor. Just as I feel his spirit with me, be assured that he will be with all of you all the time.”

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker and U.S. Rep. Steven Palazzo, both of Mississippi, delivered remarks. Other speakers included Meredith Berger, performing the duties of Under Secretary of the Navy, and Maj. Gen. Jason Bohm, commanding general, Marine Corps Recruiting Command.

Additional information about the ship and its sponsors is available at: https://ingalls.huntingtoningalls.com/DDG125christening/.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Ddg+125 Jack+h+lucas Christening Rh March+26+2022 01 Hero

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a networked, all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss., March 25, 2022 — Global engineering and defense technologies provider HII (NYSE:HII) announced that the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Ted Stevens (DDG 128). The ship’s name honors former U.S. Senator Ted Stevens, who served as a pilot in World War II and later as a senator representing Alaska. At the time he left office in 2009, he was the longest serving Republican U.S. senator in history.

“With this ship we honor Senator Stevens’ exemplary service to our nation,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of the Ingalls Shipbuilding division. She was joined at the ceremony by the senator’s wife of 29 years, Catherine Stevens; his eldest daughter, Sue Stevens Covich; and by his granddaughter, Laura Sexton, who represented his youngest daughter, Lily Stevens-Becker, who could not attend. “Each one of these women has a unique connection to our ship’s namesake,” Wilkinson said, “and we are grateful that each of them accepted the important responsibility of sponsor. Ingalls shipbuilders welcome them as part of our extended family and we will work steadfastly together to build the legacy of this public servant.”

In a family letter read during the ceremony the sponsors said Senator Stevens would resist any fanfare focused on him. “Most important,” the letter read, “is to acknowledge the men and women who will serve on USS Ted Stevens, as well as every person who is building this ship. Dad spent many years ensuring that the service has the advanced technology needed to keep our country and service members safe. This ship will carry on that legacy.”

Closing out the tradition of a keel authentication ceremony the ship’s sponsors joined Ingalls welder Henry Johnson to weld their initials onto a steel plate, signifying the keel of DDG 128 as being “truly and fairly laid.” The plate will remain affixed to the ship throughout its lifetime.

Ted Stevens is the 76th Arleigh Burke-class ship ceremonially laid and the second Flight III destroyer to be constructed at Ingalls Shipbuilding. The Flight III upgrade incorporates a number of design modifications that collectively provide significantly enhanced capability.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the U.S. military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a networked, all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss., Jan.  12, 2022 — Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division recently achieved the Aegis light-off milestone on the Navy’s first Flight III Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). This milestone marks the beginning of combat system testing as shipbuilders ready the ship for propulsion tests and eventually sea trials.

“I am again very proud of our DDG 51 team and the work they have done,” said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls Shipbuilding president. “Not only have they completed a significant program milestone aboard the first Flight III destroyer, but they have done so in the face of a pandemic. This team continues to prove it’s as strong as the ships it builds.”

The Flight III upgrade incorporates a number of design modifications that collectively provide significantly enhanced capability. Aegis light-off is an important milestone for integrating and activating all of the new electric plant equipment and combat systems.

Ddg+125 Alo Edit+01 Hero
Ingalls Shipbuilding electrician Joe Ditsworth and electrical foreman Lisa Avery initiate light-off of the Aegis Combat System aboard Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) in the ship’s combat information center.

“Through perseverance, a good plan, execution of that plan and relentless follow up, our shipbuilders have reached ALO,” said Jeff J. Davis, DDG 125 construction manager. “There is a huge collaboration effort between Ingalls, the Navy, industry partners and multiple other contractors.”

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and resilient maritime platforms ever built, to unmanned systems and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a connected, integrated full spectrum force. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(202) 580-9086

Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) Light-off

Ingalls Shipbuilding electrician Joe Ditsworth and electrical foreman Lisa Avery initiate light-off of the Aegis Combat System aboard Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) in the ship’s combat information center. 

Jan 12, 2022

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., (Dec. 02, 2021) — Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121) to the U.S. Navy during a signing ceremony held on Tuesday, Nov. 30. This milestone officially transfers custody from HII to the U.S. Navy.

“I am again very proud of our DDG team today,” said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls Shipbuilding president. “Not only have they completed another major program milestone, but they have done so in the face of a pandemic. This team, and all of our shipbuilders across our entire portfolio, are what shipbuilding is all about.”

Delivery of DDG 121 marked the 33rd destroyer Ingalls has built for Navy, with four more currently under construction, including Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123), Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), Ted Stevens (DDG 128) and Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129.)

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

DDG 121 is named for Frank E. Petersen Jr., who was the U.S. Marine Corps’ first African-American aviator and general officer. After entering the Naval Aviation Cadet Program in 1950, Petersen would go on to fly more than 350 combat missions during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Ddg 121 Delivery 113021 Wss 1 Thmb
Signing ceremonial documents declaring delivery of Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121) from Ingalls Shipbuilding to the U.S. Navy are, from left, Navy Cmdr. Daniel Hancock, prospective commanding officer DDG 121; Billy Oaks, superintendent, Aegis Combat System, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast; and Donny Dorsey, Ingalls DDG 121 ship program manager. In the background are Cmdr. Sean Doherty, left, DDG program manager’s representative; and Chief Petty Officer Yamina Bolar, DDG 121 chief Aegis fire controlman.

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides mission-critical national security solutions to government and commercial customers worldwide. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs over 44,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121) Delivery

Signing ceremonial documents declaring delivery of Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121) from Ingalls Shipbuilding to the U.S. Navy are, from left, Navy Cmdr. Daniel Hancock, prospective commanding officer DDG 121; Billy Oaks, superintendent, Aegis Combat System, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast; and Donny Dorsey, Ingalls DDG 121 ship program manager. In the background are Cmdr. Sean Doherty, left, DDG program manager’s representative; and Chief Petty Officer Yamina Bolar, DDG 121 chief Aegis fire controlman.

Mar 08, 2022

PASCAGOULA, Miss., (Sept. 17, 2021) -- Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE: HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division completed the final round of sea trials for Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121).

“The successful completion of acceptance trials is an extremely rewarding accomplishment for Ingalls and for our partners who work closely with us to ensure we achieve this milestone together,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “We are proud of our shipbuilders for working as a team to move DDG 121 one step closer to delivery.”

DDG 121 is named for Frank E. Petersen Jr., who was the U.S. Marine Corps’ first African-American aviator and general officer. After entering the Naval Aviation Cadet Program in 1950, Petersen would go on to fly more than 350 combat missions during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

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HII's Ingalls Shipbuilding division has successfully completed acceptance trials for guided missile destroyer Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG 121).

Ingalls has delivered 32 destroyers to the Navy and currently has four more under construction including Lenah Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123), Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), Ted Stevens (DDG 128) and Jeremiah Denton (DDG 129).

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management, to sea control and power projection – all in support of the United States military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense well into the 21st century.

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides mission-critical national security solutions to government and commercial customers worldwide. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs about 44,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086
General Inquiries:
Sign Up For Email Alerts

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