NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Jan. 29, 2019)–Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division has achieved a milestone in the integration of additive manufacturing into the design and fabrication of components for nuclear-powered warships. The company has delivered the first 3-D-printed metal part to the U.S. Navy for installation on an aircraft carrier.

The milestone was recognized during a brief ceremony today at Naval Station Norfolk. The part was presented to Rear Adm. Lorin Selby, Naval Sea Systems Command’s chief engineer and deputy commander for ship design, integration, and naval engineering. The part—a piping assembly—will be installed on the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and evaluated for a one-year period.

“We are pleased to have worked so closely with our Navy partners to get to the point where the first 3-D metal part will be installed on an aircraft carrier,” said Charles Southall, Newport News’ vice president of engineering and design. “The advancement of additive manufacturing will help revolutionize naval engineering and shipbuilding. It also is a significant step forward in our digital transformation of shipbuilding processes to increase efficiency, safety and affordability. This is an accomplishment we all should be proud of.”

NAVSEA last year approved the technical standards for 3-D printing after extensive collaboration with the company and industry partners that involved the rigorous printing of test parts and materials, extensive development of an engineered test program, and publishing of the results. The highly digitized process could lead to cost savings and reduced production schedules for naval ships.

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Don Hamadyk, Newport News Shipbuilding’s director of research and development, presented the first 3D printed metal part to Rear Adm. Lorin Selby, Naval Sea Systems Command’s chief engineer and deputy commander for ship design, integration, and naval engineering during a brief ceremony on USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Photo by Matt Hildreth/HII.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Mission Driven Innovative Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs more than 40,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Newport News Shipbuilding division has received a $12 million contract from the U.S. Navy for planning work on the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) as part of its planned incremental availability.

The contract is for work to be completed by Sept. 17, 2017, at Newport News and will include planning, material procurement and fabrication in support of executing the required work.

Eisenhower Cvn69 Hero

II’s Newport News Shipbuilding division has received a $12 million contract from the U.S. Navy for planning work on the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) as part of its planned incremental availability. The ship was launched at Newport News in 1975 and is shown here transiting the Arabian Gulf in August. Navy photo

“Maintaining the in-service aircraft carrier fleet involves complex work that requires significant planning and preparation,” said Chris Miner, Newport News’ vice president, in-service aircraft carrier programs. “This planning period enables us to work closely with our Navy customer to develop a framework to ensure successful project execution.”

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) is the second Nimitz-class aircraft carrier and the first ship named after the 34th president of the United States. The ship was launched in October 1975 by Newport News and is homeported at Naval Station Norfolk.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of engineering, manufacturing and management services to the nuclear energy, oil and gas markets. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 35,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086
General Inquiries:
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NEWPORT NEWS, Va., June 28, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that the company has received a $745 million cost-plus-incentive fee contract for the inactivation of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). The work will be done at HII’s Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division.

The ship was towed from Naval Station Norfolk to NNS on June 20 under the existing planning contract. NNS will defuel the ship’s eight reactors and prepare Enterprise for its eventual transit to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. The work is scheduled to complete in August 2016. More than 1,000 employees will support her inactivation.

“Although Newport News Shipbuilding has defueled and refueled many ships, including Enterprise, this is the first inactivation of a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier,” said Chris Miner, NNS’ vice president, in-service aircraft carrier programs. “Our shipbuilders know Enterprise well and have enjoyed working on her over her decades of service. We are extremely proud of her great legacy, so it is with heavy hearts that we will work to retire this one-of-a-kind ship.”

Built by Newport News shipbuilders and launched in September 1960, Enterprise served a record 51 consecutive years. The ship was the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the only one in her class. Enterprise aided in the Cuban Missile Crisis and operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn, as well as naval maritime security operations.

Statements in this release, other than statements of historical fact, constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in these statements. Factors that may cause such differences include: changes in government and customer priorities and requirements (including government budgetary constraints, shifts in defense spending, and changes in customer short-range and long-range plans); our ability to obtain new contracts, estimate our costs and perform effectively; risks related to our spin-off from Northrop Grumman (including our increased costs and leverage); our ability to realize the expected benefits from consolidation of our Gulf Coast facilities; natural disasters; adverse economic conditions in the United States and globally; and other risk factors discussed in our filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. There may be other risks and uncertainties that we are unable to predict at this time or that we currently do not expect to have a material adverse effect on our business, and we undertake no obligations to update any forward-looking statements.

About Huntington Ingalls


Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. For more than a century, HII has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder at its Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding divisions. Employing about 37,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, HII also provides a wide variety of products and services to the commercial energy industry and other government customers. For more information, visit:

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., June 20, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division celebrated the return of USS Enterprise (CVN 65) today during the ship’s final homecoming to the shipyard for her inactivation. Towed from Naval Station Norfolk to the shipyard, Enterprise had more than 100 shipbuilders on board who were involved with the construction and maintenance of this first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

“Enterprise set the stage for a long and distinguished career that transformed the U.S. Navy and put Newport News Shipbuilding on the map as the birthplace for America’s nuclear aircraft carriers,” said NNS President Matt Mulherin. “With Enterprise at Pier 2, we have our oldest nuclear carrier at one end of the shipyard, and our newest—Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78)—at the other end, in Dry Dock 12. These carriers represent our remarkable past and our bright future. They represent innovation, strength and diplomacy, and they represent the greatest shipbuilders in the world.”

As the only super carrier powered by eight nuclear reactors, Enterprise will be the first aircraft carrier to undergo an inactivation. NNS will defuel the ship’s eight reactors and prepare Enterprise for its transit to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF). The ship is scheduled to depart NNS in 2016.

Lloyd D. Joyner Sr. was among the shipbuilders who rode Enterprise from Norfolk to Newport News and one of only four shipbuilders on board who helped to build her. He started making molds for the ship in 1958.”From the beginning, everybody knew this ship was something special,” Joyner said. “It’s a privilege and an honor to be here today on her very last voyage.”

Enterprise joined the Navy’s fleet in 1961. The ship aided in the Cuban Missile Crisis and operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn, as well as naval maritime security operations.

Capt. William C. Hamilton Jr., Enterprise‘s commanding officer, addressed the shipbuilders aboard the “Big E,” referring to the ship as the poster child for the shipyard’s “Always Good Ships” motto. “What a fine ship it was, and what a great job you folks did building her and maintaining her. She is one of a kind. … It is my privilege to deliver her back to you today. With dignity and respect, we will put this old war
horse to bed.”

About Huntington Ingalls


Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. For more than a century, HII has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder at its Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding divisions. Employing about 37,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, HII also provides a wide variety of products and services to the commercial energy industry and other government customers. For more information, visit:

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