PASCAGOULA, Miss., (July 11, 2022) – San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28) departed from HII’s (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division on Monday, en route to its commissioning site in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

“Ingalls Shipbuilders take great pride in knowing that each and every amphibious ship that leaves this shipyard will support our Navy and Marine Corps team defending our nation,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “We at Ingalls remain committed to this partnership and consider it a privilege to serve those who serve.”

Fort Lauderdale was delivered to the U.S. Navy in March following acceptance sea trials and is the 12th San Antonio-class ship delivered by HII. Additional San Antonio-class ships are under construction at Ingalls, including Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) and the first Flight II amphibious ship in the San Antonio classHarrisburg (LPD 30). Later this year, fabrication will begin on the 15th San Antonio-class ship, Pittsburgh (LPD 31).

“Watching Fort Lauderdale sail away to join the Navy’s fleet is a very proud moment for our entire LPD shipbuilding team and our skilled workforce,” said Mike Pruitt, Ingalls LPD program manager. “Our shipbuilders have done an outstanding job building a mission capable ship for these sailors and our country.”

LPD 28 is scheduled to be commissioned on July 30 in Fort Lauderdale. It is named to honor the Florida city’s historic ties to the U.S. Navy, which date back to the 1830s and include an important naval training center during World War II.

Amphibious transport docks are a major part of the Navy’s 21st century expeditionary force, deployed with a U.S. Marine Corps Air-Ground Task Force for amphibious and expeditionary crisis response operations that range from deterrence and joint-force enablement to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss., (June 16, 2022) — HII (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $240 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for amphibious transport dock LPD 32. The ship will be the 16th in the San Antonio class constructed at Ingalls Shipbuilding.

“Our shipbuilders are proud to continue building these amphibious ships that are integral to the Navy fleet” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said.

“The Funds From This Contract Will Be Used To Purchase Long-Lead Time Material And Major Equipment Across A Supplier Network Of Nearly 400 Companies In 30 States.”

LPD 32 will be the third Flight II amphibious ship in the San Antonio class. LPD Flight II is the next generation amphibious ship to replace Whidbey Island (LSD 41) and Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) classes of dock landing ships. Ingalls has delivered 12 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy and has two more under construction, including Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) and Harrisburg (LPD 30). Fabrication of the 15th San Antonio-class ship, Pittsburgh (LPD 31), will begin later this year.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss., June 13, 2022 — All-domain defense and technologies partner HII (NYSE:HII) announced today the successful demonstration of capabilities enabling HII-built amphibious warships to launch, operate with and recover HII-built large-diameter unmanned underwater vehicles (LDUUV).

The research and development initiative between HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding and Mission Technologies divisions is among a portfolio of corporate led and funded internal research and development efforts aimed at advancing mission-critical technology solutions in support of HII’s national security customers.

“HII is committed to advancing the future of distributed maritime operations and demonstrating our capability to support unmanned vehicles on amphibious ships,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of Ingalls Shipbuilding, which hosted and partnered in the demonstration. “I am very proud of our team’s initiative to strengthen the flexibility of the ships we build by anticipating the challenges and opportunities that exist for our customers.”

“This is a great example of how HII can leverage expertise across divisions to develop unique solutions for customers,” said Andy Green, president of Mission Technologies. “HII is focused on growing critical enabling technologies, like unmanned systems and AI/ML data analytics, to help further enhance the capabilities of our national security platforms.”

HII-built San Antonio-class amphibious warships have unique well decks that can be flooded to launch and recover various maritime platforms. The U.S. Navy has previously demonstrated the ability to recover space craft from the amphibious warship well deck.

HII’s Advanced Technology Group, comprised of employees from across the company, performed the launch and recovery demonstration with a prototype platform called Pharos and HII’s LDUUV Proteus. The demonstration took place in the Pascagoula River.

The demonstration involved having the LDUUV approach and be captured by the Pharos cradle, while Pharos was being towed behind a small craft that simulated an amphibious ship at low speed. Pharos was put in a tow position, then using a remote control, it was ballasted down in the trailing position allowing the LDUUV to navigate into Pharos. Once the unmanned vehicle was captured, Pharos was deballasted back up into a recovery and transport position. The demonstration also included ballasting down to launch the LDUUV after the capture.

Pharos is outfitted with heavy duty wheels to allow its transport maneuverability within the well deck of an amphibious ship for stowage on the vehicle decks. Pharos can be rolled off the back of an amphibious ship while using the ship’s existing winch capabilities to extend and retract the platform from the well deck. The Pharos design is scalable and reconfigurable to fit various unmanned underwater or unmanned surface vehicles.

The Pharos design was conducted by HII, and three main partners supported the development. The University of New Orleans, in conjunction with the Navy, performed the initial model testing, and the prototype device was fabricated by Metal Shark in Louisiana.

HII is currently exploring modifications for other UUV’s and participating in live demonstrations with the fleet within the next year. HII will use results from the Pharos demonstration to further mature concepts and continue to develop innovative national security solutions.

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HII’s Pharos prototype platform being towed behind a small craft in the Pascagoula River while recovering HII’s Proteus LDUUV during a demonstration June 8, 2022.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss., June 11, 2022 — HII (NYSE: HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the company’s 13th amphibious transport dock, Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29), constructed for the U.S. Navy.

“For nearly two decades, we have had the opportunity to build these amphibious ships, and we look forward to continuing this journey with such a valued partner,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “Today we reflect on Richard M. McCool Jr.’s bravery and heroism in front of a ship that will carry another generation of brave sailors and Marines into missions defending our freedom.”

“For nearly two decades, we have had the opportunity to build these amphibious ships, and we look forward to continuing this journey with such a valued partner,” Ingalls Shipbuilding President Kari Wilkinson said. “Today we reflect on Richard M. McCool Jr.’s bravery and heroism in front of a ship that will carry another generation of brave sailors and Marines into missions defending our freedom.”

LPD 29 is named to honor U.S. Navy Capt. Richard M. McCool Jr., who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in rescuing survivors from a sinking destroyer and for saving his own landing support ship during a World War II kamikaze attack. His rescue efforts took place exactly 77 years prior to the day Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) was christened.

Under Secretary of the Navy Erik Raven was the keynote speaker.

“Richard M. McCool Jr. truly embodied the spirit of service above self,” Raven said. “The sailors and Marines who will sail on this future ship carry on that legacy following the example of spirit, patriotism and selflessness set by Richard M. McCool Jr.”

When speaking of America’s defense capabilities, Raven said, “We are able to deploy exquisite capabilities across the globe in great part due to our dedicated shipbuilders and our talented team. These talented Americans are essential to making sure that our naval forces have the ships that they need.”

Richard M. McCool Jr. is co-sponsored by Shana McCool and Kate Oja, granddaughters of the ship’s namesake. Together, the two sponsors officially christened Richard M. McCool Jr. by smashing a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the ship. Shana spoke on behalf of both sponsors at today’s ceremony.

When speaking about her grandfather’s heroic acts some 77 years ago, Shana McCool said, “To the commanding officer and future crew of this ship, may she (the ship) keep you safe. And in the words of our grandfather, may you always remember to fight as a unit and not as individuals.”

Additional information about the ship and its sponsors is available at: https://ingalls.huntingtoningalls.com/lpd29christening/

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(202) 580-9086

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division is the sole provider of the San Antonio-class amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. These ships feature many revolutionary design innovations, including enhanced war fighting and survivability capabilities, improved command and control capabilities, stealthy design elements, and several quality of life improvements.

Via The Hill by Seth Cropsey: 

The Sea Services should grasp the role large amphibious warships will play in a Pacific war. The Navy’s shipbuilding plan should reflect this and include a significant amphibious element to ensure its ability to fight and win in the western Pacific.

The Navy’s 30-year shipbuilding plan reveals a broader fight within the Defense Department. The issue is not simply strategic, but operational and force-structural — how to transform the Navy to ensure it can deter and defeat China in a large-scale Indo-Pacific war. As in World War II, a vital issue is the role of heavy amphibious assault ships in the Navy’s strategy.

The Navy’s current plan is — to understate it — out of touch with strategic reality.

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At minimum, the battle force will shrink from its level of just under 300 ships to 280 ships by 2027. The Navy then presents three alternative force structures, each with a “transition” period that expands the fleet to slightly under 300 ships. Under the most ambitious plan, the Navy will then reach 355 ships by 2043; under the other two plans, it will cap out in the mid-320s.

Numbers alone do not tell the whole story. The Navy’s current scheme, under all three of its plans, will include at least 31 amphibious warships by 2032. This nominally aligns with the requirements the Marine Corps has outlined — a force of at least 31 amphibious warships—versus the Navy’s desired 25 amphibious warships.

Two facts must be grasped — the role of amphibious warships in Indo-Pacific strategy and operational planning, and the sort of warships the Sea Services require.

Read the full story in The Hill.

HII is an all-domain defense and technologies partner, recognized worldwide as America’s largest shipbuilder. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable an all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

PASCAGOULA, Miss., March 18, 2022 — Global engineering and defense technologies provider HII (NYSE:HII) announced today that the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division has delivered amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28) to the U.S. Navy.

Fort Lauderdale is the 12th San Antonio-class ship delivered by HII. Amphibious transport docks are a major part of the Navy’s 21st century expeditionary force, deployed with a U. S. Marine Corps Air-Ground Task Force for amphibious and expeditionary crisis response operations that range from deterrence and joint-force enablement to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

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San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28)

“We at HII and Ingalls are honored to support our customer on the national security mission at the heart of this work,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of the Ingalls Shipbuilding. “Mindful of safety and quality, we are incredibly proud of the collaborative Navy-industry team that delivers this vital capability.”

Fort Lauderdale was delivered during a March 11 ceremony with shipbuilders, ship’s force and representatives of Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast together in attendance. The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the Navy.

“What a great tradition to be part of,” said Steve Sloan, Ingalls LPD program manager. “This delivery event is the culmination of hard work and dedication of thousands of shipbuilders, industry partners from just about every state, as well as our Navy Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast, shipmates that worked with us each and every day to ensure Fort Lauderdale became a mission capable ship.”

Ingalls has additional San Antonio-class ships under construction, including Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) and Harrisburg (LPD 30), the latter of which is the first of the LPD Flight II ships, designed as the replacement for the aging Whidbey Island-class LSDs. Fabrication of the 15th San Antonio-class ship, Pittsburgh (LPD 31), will begin later this year.

LPD 28 is named Fort Lauderdale to honor the Florida city’s historic ties to the U.S. Navy, which date back to the 1830s and include an important naval training center during World War II.

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a networked, all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

 

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(202) 580-9086
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LPD 28 Builder's Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries has announced that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division recently completed the first round of sea trials for San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28).

May 17, 2022

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Feb. 23, 2022) -- Global engineering and defense technologies provider HII (NYSE:HII) announced that the company’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division ceremonially has authenticated the keel of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock Harrisburg (LPD 30). The ship’s sponsor, Alexandra Curry, a resident of Middletown, Pennsylvania, and wife of the Middletown mayor, was unable to attend the ceremony so Program Executive Officer Ships Rear Adm. Tom Anderson, stepped in to declare the keel “truly and fairly laid.”

“While she could not join us, we welcome Mrs. Curry in spirit as she is now an important part of our shipbuilding family,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of Ingalls Shipbuilding. “We look forward to being with her throughout the life of the ship, and we are very grateful for her commitment to this crew. She is a true patriot, with deep respect and gratitude for military service.”

The keel ceremony marked the start of construction for Harrisburg by welding the initials of the ship’s sponsor into a ceremonial plate.

Harrisburg is being built at Ingalls Shipbuilding and will be the first Flight II amphibious ship in the San Antonio class. LPD Flight II is the next generation amphibious ship to replace Whidbey Island (LSD 41) and Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) classes of dock landing ships. Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy and has three more under construction.

The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and survivable naval ships ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a networked, all-domain force. Headquartered in Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 01, 2022 — Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today the successful completion of acceptance sea trials on Friday for the amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28). The San Antonio-class ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent several days with the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey. Ingalls’ shipbuilders will now complete final finish work on the ship in preparation for delivery this quarter.

Fort Lauderdale is a terrific example of what our collective team is accomplishing together,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of Ingalls Shipbuilding. “LPD 28 demonstrates what Navy-industry collaboration can do to evolve a ship design to new requirements while maintaining the talented team that is demonstrating such efficiency and predictability in delivering on commitments. I couldn’t be more proud of their success.”

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San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28).

Key demonstrations by the Ingalls’ test and trials team included: anchor handling, ballast/de-ballast, detect-to-engage, and running the ship at full power and steering.

“It takes a lot of hard work from the entire shipbuilding team to make these sea trials successful,” said Mike Pruitt, LPD ship program manager at Ingalls Shipbuilding. “Fort Lauderdale is exhibit A of HII’s commitment to quality and meets our high standard for every ship that we build.”

Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy and has three under construction that include Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28), Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29), and Harrisburg (LPD 30). Additionally, fabrication of the 15th San Antonio-class ship, Pittsburgh (LPD 31), will begin in the spring.

LPD 28 is named Fort Lauderdale to honor the Florida city’s historic ties to the U.S. Navy, which date back to the 1830s and include an important naval training center during World War II.

The San Antonio-class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and resilient maritime platforms ever built, to unmanned systems, ISR and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a connected, integrated full spectrum force. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information, visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Danny Hernandez
Director of Public Affairs
(202) 580-9086

LPD 28 Trials

San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28).

Apr 18, 2022

PASCAGOULA, Miss. (Jan 7, 2022) — Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE: HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division announced today the successful launch of amphibious transport dock Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29). Richard M. McCool Jr., the 13th LPD in the San Antonio class of amphibious assault force ships, will support U.S. amphibious assault, special operations and expeditionary warfare missions through the first half of the 21st century.

“The LPD class ships, like all of our programs, are critically important to U.S. national security,” said Kari Wilkinson, president of HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division. “In addition, thousands of Americans, from engineers to electricians, have worked on LPD 29 over the years. Ingalls Shipbuilding is proud to build them and even more proud of the talented people that make up our shipbuilding team.”

With the assistance of tugs, Richard M. McCool Jr. came off the floating dry dock Wednesday morning, after first being translated via Ingalls’ rail car system. The dock was moved away from the pier and then ballasted to float off the ship. 

Launching Richard M. McCool Jr. is the first of a series of significant milestone events in bringing the ship to life, and eventual delivery to the U.S. Navy which is planned for later next year.

Ingalls Shipbuilding is building the entire San Antonio class of ships, the newest addition to the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships that displace 25,000 tons are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey.

HII is a global engineering and defense technologies provider. With a 135-year history of trusted partnerships in advancing U.S. national security, HII delivers critical capabilities ranging from the most powerful and resilient maritime platforms ever built, to unmanned systems and AI/ML analytics. HII leads the industry in mission-driven solutions that support and enable a connected, integrated full spectrum force. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII’s skilled workforce is 44,000 strong. For more information please visit:

MEDIA CONTACT
Kimberly Aguillard
(202) 580-9086

Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) Launch

Richard M. McCool Jr. (LPD 29) was launched recently at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division. 

Jan 07, 2022

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