NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 30, 2018)--Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) is 75 percent structurally complete following the recent installation of the forward area of the ship’s main deck.

Kennedy, the second ship in the Gerald R. Ford class of carriers, has been taking shape at the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding division since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015. The ship is being built using modular construction, a process where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form a structural unit, known as a superlift. The superlift is then outfitted with piping, electrical equipment, cable, ventilation and joiner work and is lifted from the assembly area into the dry dock.

The 750-metric ton forward section of the main deck includes the machinery spaces located over the ship’s forward diesel generators. Also installed was the first piece of the aircraft carrier flight deck, which includes command and control, pilot ready rooms and additional support spaces, a jet blast deflector, and components of the advanced arresting gear system.

With the recent superlifts, 341 of the total 447 sections are currently in place. Kennedy stands about 100 feet in height in the dry dock with only the island and main mast remaining to bring the ship to its full height of 252 feet.

A third key milestone also was achieved recently when the first two generators supporting the electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) were installed.

“We are very proud of the progress we are making on the Kennedy,” said Lucas Hicks, Newport News’ vice president, CVN 79 program. “The ship now is 75 percent structurally erected and more than 40 percent complete. Many of the improvements we have made over the construction of CVN 78, including increased pre-outfitting and performing more complex assemblies in our shops, will allow us to launch the ship three months earlier than planned.”

Kennedy is scheduled to be christened in the fourth quarter of 2019 and delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2022.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 39,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

Statements in this release, other than statements of historical fact, constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in these statements. Factors that may cause such differences include: changes in government and customer priorities and requirements (including government budgetary constraints, shifts in defense spending, and changes in customer short-range and long-range plans); our ability to estimate our future contract costs and perform our contracts effectively; changes in procurement processes and government regulations and our ability to comply with such requirements; our ability to deliver our products and services at an affordable life cycle cost and compete within our markets; natural and environmental disasters and political instability; adverse economic conditions in the United States and globally; changes in key estimates and assumptions regarding our pension and retiree health care costs; security threats, including cyber security threats, and related disruptions; and other risk factors discussed in our filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. There may be other risks and uncertainties that we are unable to predict at this time or that we currently do not expect to have a material adverse effect on our business, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements. You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements that we may make.

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NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Feb. 22, 2018)--Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Newport News Shipbuilding division has built 70 percent of the structures necessary to complete the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN 79).

Like its predecessor, the first-in-class USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), Kennedy is being built with a modular construction technique where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form larger structures called superlifts. The superlifts are pre-outfitted and hoisted into Dry Dock 12—where the ship is being built—by the company’s 1,050-metric ton gantry crane.

Shipbuilders have successfully erected 317 lifts since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015. Kennedy is on track to be completed with 447 total lifts.

The recent 806-metric ton superlift consisted of 17 individual units and was about 171 feet long and about 92 feet wide. The structure comprises berthing areas, electrical equipment rooms and workshops and took 18 months to build.

“This superlift is in the forward part of the ship, about halfway between the bow and midship,” said Mike Butler, program director of CVN 79. “It represents one of the key build strategy changes for Kennedy: building superlifts that are larger and more complete before they are erected on the ship. We are pleased with how construction on the Kennedy is progressing, and we look forward to additional milestones as we inch closer to christening of the ship.”

Kennedy is scheduled to launch in 2020.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 38,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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PASCAGOULA, Miss. (Aug. 21, 2017)—Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today the successful completion of acceptance sea trials for the amphibious transport dock Portland (LPD 27). The San Antonio-class ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent last week with the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), performing more than 200 trial events that included both in-port and underway portions.

“These sea trials provide an opportunity to showcase the ship’s tremendous capabilities and the build and test skills of our shipbuilders,” Ingalls President Brian Cuccias said. “The success of these milestones is important as we continue to remain competitive and keep our supplier base and production lines active in the construction of these quality amphibious warships.”

Key demonstrations performed during acceptance trials for INSURV by the Ingalls’ test and trials team included: the anchor-handling demonstration, ballast/de-ballast demonstration, detect-to-engage exercise, running the ship at full power and steering. Now Ingalls’ shipbuilders will put their final touches on the ship in preparation for delivery this year.

“Our team puts in a lot of hard work and effort to make these sea trials successful,” said George Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. “We get better with every LPD we build, and we look forward to delivering a very complex and capable ship to our sailors and Marines. As always, this success was a joint effort between our shipbuilders, test and trials team and our partners at Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast.”

Portland (LPD 27) is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards.

Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the Navy, including John P. Murtha (LPD 26) in 2016. In June, Ingalls received an advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD 29, the 13th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio class. Ingalls will lay the keel of the 12th San Antonio-class ship, Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28), this fall.

Portland’s successful sea trial proves the dedication and quality of work our shipbuilders continue to provide to the LPD program,” said Steve Sloan, Ingalls’ LPD program manager. “I’m proud of the performance of the shipbuilders and the ship during acceptance trials, and now we will continue to work the final fit-and-finish touches before LPD 27’s delivery this fall.”

The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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PASCAGOULA, Miss. (July 3, 2017)—Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division announced today that the amphibious transport dock Portland (LPD 27) has completed her first set of sea trials. Ingalls’ test and trials team spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems.

 “This successful sea trial is another testament to the quality work our shipbuilders continue to provide in the LPD program,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “These are complex vessels, and I’m proud of our workforce, who have the skills and knowledge it takes to design, build and test these American warships.”

 Major testing conducted during builder’s trials include anchor-handling, ballast/de-ballast of the ship’s well deck, detect-to-engage, full power ahead and astern and steering demonstrations.

“We place great importance on our relationships with our customers and the responsibility we have to the sailors and Marines who will own this ship,” said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ vice president of program management. “The LPD team is strong and very prepared to continue providing these capable assets to our country.”

 Ingalls’ shipbuilders are now preparing Portland for acceptance trials in August, when the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) will conduct inspections and witness final demonstrations before the ship is delivered to the Navy.

“Our shipbuilders continue to work in concert with one another, and this ship is another example of their successes,” said George Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. “We have the best construction team in our industry today, and this team, along with the nationwide supplier base, will continue to see more successes with their winning behaviors and team spirit.”

 Portland (LPD 27) is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards.

 Ingalls has delivered 10 San Antonio-class ships to the Navy, including John P. Murtha (LPD 26) in 2016. Ingalls will lay the keel of the 12th San Antonio-class ship, Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28), this fall. Last Friday, Ingalls was awarded an advance procurement contract for LPD 29.

 The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:
 

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NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 22, 2017)—Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) grew about 70 feet in length with the addition of the lower stern. The lower stern was lifted into place at the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding division, where the second Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier is now 50 percent structurally complete.

Like FordKennedy is being built using modular construction, a process where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form larger structural units (called “superlifts”), equipment is then installed, and the large superlifts are lifted into the dry dock using the company’s 1,050-metric ton gantry crane.

“This is a significant milestone in the ship’s construction schedule,” said Mike Shawcross, Newport News’ vice president, John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) and Enterprise (CVN 80) aircraft carrier construction. “We are halfway through lifting the units onto the ship, and many of the units are larger and nearly all are more complete than the CVN 78 lifts were. This is one of many lessons learned from the construction of the lead ship that are helping to reduce construction costs and improve efficiencies on Kennedy.”

After several days of preparations, the 932-metric ton lower stern lift took about an hour to complete, thanks to a team of about 25 shipbuilders—from riggers and the crane operator to shipwrights and ship fitters. The lower stern consists of 30 individual units and includes the ship’s rudders, steering gear rooms and electrical power distribution room. The carrier is on track to be completed with 445 lifts, which is 51 fewer than Ford and 149 fewer than USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), the last Nimitz-class carrier.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 1, 2017)–Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Newport News Shipbuilding division delivered the first-of-class aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) to the U.S. Navy on Wednesday. The aircraft carrier successfully completed acceptance trials on May 26.

“Today is a historic day for Newport News Shipbuilding and one that is personally rewarding for me,” said Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin. “I’ve had the pleasure of watching our shipbuilders bring this great warship to life. From her first cut of steel to her final round of testing, Ford is proof of our shipbuilders’ exceptional skills and talents. I am proud of their innovation, perseverance and unwavering commitment that has built the most advanced aircraft carrier in the world. We are honored to deliver Gerald R. Ford to the Navy, and we do so with full confidence in her unmatched power and ability to sail the seas in protection of our freedom for the next half century.”

Ford is the product of years of construction, planning and design. More than 5,000 shipbuilders in Newport News and thousands of suppliers across the United States contributed to the first-of-class ship.

“On behalf of our shipbuilders, I can say we are all proud to have been a part of the Gerald R. Ford construction program,” said Rolf Bartschi, Newport News’ vice president, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) carrier construction. “This great ship will serve our nation for the next 50 years, and it will offer our Navy and sailors the most technologically advanced platform to carry out their missions.”

Gerald R. Ford is the first in a class of next-generation aircraft carriers designed to replace Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. The Ford class features a new nuclear power plant, a redesigned island, electromagnetic catapults, improved weapons movement, an enhanced flight deck capable of increased aircraft sortie rates, and growth margin for future technologies. Each Ford-class ship will operate with a smaller crew than a Nimitz-class carrier and will provide $4 billion in total ownership cost savings for the Navy. Aircraft carriers provide sovereign, mobile U.S. territory and are a visible symbol of U.S. power. They are the centerpiece of our nation’s security strategy and support and protect the global economy through the protection of sea lanes around the world.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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PASCAGOULA, Miss. (May 3, 2017)—Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the amphibious assault ship Tripoli (LHA 7) from its floating dry dock on Monday. The launch was accomplished 13 weeks ahead of the original construction schedule.

“Ingalls has been the Navy’s large-deck amphib builder since the early 1970s,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “Our vast knowledge and experience in the design and construction of these great ships is paying dividends—not only for the American taxpayer, but also for the Navy-Marine Corps team and the sailors and Marines who will be operating these important warships in defense of our country.”

Tripoli, the second of the America-class amphibious assault ships, was translated to the company’s floating dry dock on April 8 and, after some prep work on the ship’s hull, was launched on Saturday. The next ship in the class, Bougainville (LHA 8), is scheduled to start construction in late 2018.

Ingalls is currently the sole builder of large-deck amphibious ships for the Navy. The shipyard delivered its first amphibious assault ship, the Iwo Jima-class USS Tripoli (LPH 10), in 1966. Ingalls has since built five Tarawa-class (LHA 1) ships, eight Wasp-class (LHD 1) ships and the first in a new class of ships, America (LHA 6).

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 29, 2017)–Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (NYSE:HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division today celebrated the christening of Indiana (SSN 789), the 16th Virginia-class submarine.

With a single swing, ship’s sponsor Diane Donald performed the traditional honor of breaking a bottle of American sparkling wine across the submarine’s hull. Donald is the wife of Adm. Kirkland Donald (U.S. Navy, Ret.), former director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion.

“It’s the honor of a lifetime to be here today,” said Donald. “While the size of the submarine alone is stunning, the complexity inside sets it apart from any other machine ever built. These ships are second to none, made in America by truly remarkable Americans.”

Vice President Mike Pence, former governor of Indiana, served as the ceremony’s keynote speaker. Today is the 100th day since he and President Donald Trump assumed office.

“He sent me here today on this historic occasion as a sign of his deep commitment to the Armed Forces of the United States of America, and to his commitment to make the strongest fighting force in the world even stronger still,” Pence said of Trump. Speaking to the shipbuilders, he acknowledged their dedication and skill. “You have the gratitude of the commander in chief for your unwavering commitment to your country, your patriotism, your craftsmanship, and rest assured, President Trump will honor your commitment with historic investments in our national defense.”

Indiana Christening01 Hero

With one strong swing, Ship's Sponsor Diane Donald christened the Virginia-class submarine Indiana (SSN 789), witnessed by (from left) Vice President Mike Pence, Indiana Commander Jesse Zimbauer and Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin, and an audience of nearly 4,000 event guests. Photo by Ashley Major/HII

Other ceremony participants included Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va.; Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Ind.; Sec. Sean Stackley, acting secretary of the Navy; Vice Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Forces; Adm. Tom Fargo (U.S. Navy, Ret.), chairman of the board, Huntington Ingalls Industries; Mike Petters, president and CEO, Huntington Ingalls Industries; Matt Mulherin, president, Newport News Shipbuilding; and Jeffrey Geiger, president, General Dynamics Electric Boat.

Stackley spoke of the U.S. Navy’s important presence around the world. “More than a hundred U.S. Navy ships are underway, providing assurance to our allies, maintaining persistent surveillance in regions of interest, conducting special operations undetected, safeguarding the choke points of the world, standing poised to assure access to strike if necessary, and providing humanitarian relief if needed. And all the while, [Navy ships are] serving as the enduring, reliable deterrent that underpins our nation’s security.”

Speaking on behalf of the state of Indiana, Donnelly thanked the shipbuilders for their service to the U.S. Navy and the Indiana crew. “This crew is going to be at the very tip of the spear,” he said, “and you have given them the tools, the equipment, the ability to accomplish everything.”

About 4,000 Newport News shipbuilders have participated in Indiana’s construction in partnership with General Dynamics Electric Boat. Construction began in September 2012 and is about 90 percent complete. The submarine is on track to deliver to the Navy this year.

“It’s hard to describe what it’s like to build one of the most complex machines in the world,” said Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin. “For our shipbuilders who do this every day – they can even lose perspective of the contributions they are making to our Navy and to our nation. For them, it’s all part of a day’s work—a long, hard, honest day’s work. However, as you look upon this magnificent vessel, I think you’ll agree, it’s no ordinary job. In fact, it’s pretty extraordinary. Our shipbuilders define what ‘Made in America’ means.” 

Virginia-class submarines, a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines, are designed for a broad spectrum of open-ocean and littoral missions to replace the Navy’s Los Angeles-class submarines as they are retired. Virginia-class submarines incorporate dozens of new technologies and innovations that increase firepower, maneuverability and stealth, and significantly enhance their warfighting capabilities. These submarines are capable of supporting multiple mission packages and can operate at submerged speeds of more than 25 knots for months at a time.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 14, 2017)–Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Newport News Shipbuilding division has successfully completed builder’s sea trials of the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The first-of-class carrier left Newport News on Saturday and returned to Naval Station Norfolk today.

Builder’s sea trials test the ship’s systems, components and compartments at sea for the first time. The trials also include high-speed runs and demonstrate many of the carrier’s other capabilities.

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The first-of-class aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) left Newport News Shipbuilding on April 8 for builder’s sea trials and returned to Naval Station Norfolk today. Builder’s sea trials test the ship’s systems, components and compartments at sea for the first time. Photo by Matt Hildreth/HII

“In my 36 years with Newport News Shipbuilding, I’ve ridden many sea trials,” said Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin. “While they have all been great experiences, this one was especially rewarding. I’ve been with this ship since 2001, when she was still just a design concept. To see her come to life and perform as she was designed and built to do is awe-inspiring and a testament to her shipbuilders and Navy crew.”

Newport News shipbuilders partnered with Gerald R. Ford sailors and personnel from Naval Sea Systems Command to perform the sea trials tests. Among the sea trial participants were Adm. James Caldwell, director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, and Rear Adm. Brian K. Antonio, program executive officer, aircraft carriers.

“Everybody has to work together to really exercise the ship and take it through its final paces,” said Rolf Bartschi, Newport News Shipbuilding’s vice president, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) carrier construction. “We work to test the systems and actually operate the ship out here at sea. It’s fantastic to be out and really see this ship come to life.”

Susan Ford Bales, ship’s sponsor and President Gerald R. Ford’s daughter, was unable to participate in sea trials but shared in the excitement. “Completion of builder’s sea trials for Dad’s namesake aircraft carrier is the magnificent culmination of years of hard work,” she said. “I’m ecstatic and could not be prouder of the ship’s successful performance. CVN 78 is the mightiest ship ever built, and you can draw a straight line—a very straight line—as to why that is so: The ship is built by the greatest shipbuilders in the world, my fellow Newport News shipbuilders. I’m thrilled to add my congratulations and heartfelt thanks—as Dad most certainly would—to the entire Newport News Shipbuilding team, and to the remarkable crew of the Ford, for their patriotic commitment to excellence and for a job well done—very well done. As the ship’s sponsor, I look forward with great excitement to commissioning the USS Gerald R. Ford into the fleet very soon.”

Prior to delivery, the ship will undergo acceptance trials, conducted by U.S. Navy Board of Inspection and Survey representatives, to do a final test and evaluation of the ship’s systems and performance.

Gerald R. Ford is the first in a class of next-generation aircraft carriers designed to replace Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. The Ford class features a new nuclear power plant, a redesigned island, electromagnetic catapults, improved weapons movement, an enhanced flight deck capable of increased aircraft sortie rates, and growth margin for future technologies. Each Ford-class ship will operate with a smaller crew than a Nimitz-class carrier and provide a $4 billion total ownership cost savings for the Navy. Aircraft carriers provide sovereign, mobile U.S. territory and are a visible symbol of U.S. power. They are the centerpiece of our nation’s security strategy and support and protect the global economy through the protection of sea lanes around the world.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 3, 2017)–Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that the newest Virginia-class submarine (VCS), Washington (SSN 787), successfully completed its initial sea trials on Sunday. Sea trials test the submarine’s capabilities at sea. Washington was built as part of a teaming agreement between HII’s Newport News Shipbuilding division and General Dynamics Electric Boat.

“The ship and its crew performed exceptionally well,” said Matt Needy, Newport News’ vice president of submarines and fleet support. “It was truly an amazing process to see the hundreds of suppliers and the many thousands of shipbuilders from both Newport News and Electric Boat work closely with the ship’s crew to bring this great warship to life.”

All systems, components and compartments were tested during the trials. The submarine submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater. Washington will undergo a round of acceptance trials before delivery to the Navy by Newport News.

Construction of Washington, which began in September 2011, marked the beginning of the VCS program’s two-submarines-per-year build plan for Newport News.

About Huntington Ingalls Industries

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of professional services to partners in government and industry. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII’s Technical Solutions division provides a wide range of professional services through its Fleet Support, Integrated Missions Solutions, Nuclear & Environmental, and Oil & Gas groups. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 37,000 people operating both domestically and internationally. For more information, visit:

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